Don’t get a Bengal if what you’re looking for is a sweet, gentle lap cat or a living sculpture that requires little interaction.

The intelligent, curious Bengal is highly active. Constantly on the move, he loves climbing to high places, enjoys playing fetch and going for walks on leash, and thrives best when he has access to a large outdoor enclosure where he can indulge in the favorite feline hobby of bird-watching.

Some Bengals are fond of playing in water, and you may find yours fishing out of the aquarium if you’re not careful. This is a happy, entertaining cat who wants lots of attention. He does best with a person who spends a lot of time at home and will enjoy playing and interacting with him.  The short coat is easy to groom with weekly brushing. Trim the nails as needed.

“Steve (we know him as Tiger) is happy at his new home. Bonding is everything when you are looking for a Bengal. You can see why, they grow to be huge cats.”  ~Lydia

(Excerpt from Wikipedia) “The Bengal is a domestic cat breed developed to look like exotic jungle cats such as leopards, ocelots, margays and clouded leopards. Bengal cats were developed by the selective breeding of domestic cats crossed then backcrossed and backcrossed once more with hybrids from the Asian leopard cat (ALC), Prionailurus bengalensis bengalensis, and domestic cat, with the goal of creating a confident, healthy, and friendly cat with a highly contrasted and vividly marked coat.[1]

The name “Bengal cat” was derived from the taxonomic name of the Asian leopard cat (P. b. bengalensis). They have a “wild” appearance with large spots, rosettes, and a light/white belly, and a body structure reminiscent of the ALC.[2] Once separated by at least four generations from the original ALC × domestic cat crossing, the breed possesses a gentle domestic cat temperament.

Bengal cats are generally a bright orange to light brown color, although pale or off-white “snow” Bengals also exist, and are popular among owners.”

Click Here for more info about Bengals on Wikipedia